Tag Archives: terrorism

Weeping Jesus

     In January of 2002, my family visited the National Memorial in downtown Oklahoma City. After we explained to our girls the horrific story of the April 19, 1995, bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah federal building, we began walking through the memorial that has since been built on the spot where the building once stood. I have never been so moved as I was that day.

     At each end are huge gates… one representing the moment before the bombing (9:01 a.m.) and the other representing the moment after the attack (9:03 a.m.). And in between those two gates… in between those two moments… was the blast and its aftermath. Each of the lives lost is symbolized by an empty chair bearing the name of one of the 168 victims. Walking around the reflecting pool, looking at the chairs and the remains of the one piece of wall that still stands, I slowly began to realize that the chairs were of different sizes… and I remembered that 19 of those killed were innocent children at play in their day-care center. And I was struck by the horror of it all over again.

     At each end of the memorial site stand two church buildings that had also been damaged in the blast. Across the street at the eastern end is the United Methodist Church, which included an open chapel on the grounds when they rebuilt, complete with helpful brochures, healing pamphlets, and even free Bibles, offering the peace of Christ and the hope of Jesus to any who want to leave the terror behind.

     Across the street at the western end is a Roman Catholic Church, that commissioned a memorial of their own when they rebuilt: a statue of Jesus, with his back to the grisly destruction, weeping.  weeping Jesus

     Jesus Christ, weeps in the face of such hatred that would be so violent and murderous. He turns his back to such evil and destruction. God cannot stand sin… sin cannot abide in his presence. According to the Gospels, God the Father hid his face from His own Son when He was bearing our sins on that cross so long ago.

     Engraved on the gates of the Oklahoma City Memorial are these words: “We come here to remember those who were killed, those who survived and those changed forever…May all who leave here know the impact of violence…”

     We need to remember. Especially in light of the unimaginable events that we have since lived through lately. Bombings. Riots. Protests. Police shootings. Shootings of police. A truck deliberately crashing into pedestrians. Mass murder at a nightclub. A teen gunman in a mall luring people to their deaths. And that’s just the last few weeks in non-war zones. And looking ahead, we see events like the political rallies and even the Olympics coming up soon and wonder if we’re destined to endure even more heartbreak, sorrow, and terror.

     Terrorism is well named. For it is terror we feel when faced with these unthinkable, cowardly acts of violence. There is no protection it seems, no hope, no safety, no peace, when faced with terror.

     Yet, we are reminded by these two churches, and by the Scriptures, that even though our Lord despises and rejects such hatred, He is never untouched by the pain and the suffering. His back may be turned to evil, but his face is filled with tears of compassion and love. He promises to walk through the darkest of times hand-in-hand with any one of us who calls on Him and allows Him to bring us His peace and His comfort.

     We celebrated Christ’s victory over sin and death just a few months ago at Easter. But a key part of the Easter story is remembering the beatings, whippings, and gruesome death He endured. We remember his broken body and His shed blood as He turned His back to a cross and allowed Himself to be nailed to it in order to once and for all time purchase our eternal freedom. Since God cannot allow sin into His presence, and every one of us has sinned, we were all doomed for an eternity separated from God… an eternal death. But Jesus Christ, the only one who ever walked through life without ever sinning, took our place… facing death and hell so that we could be freed from that judgment of eternal death. Like when someone chooses to pay off a debt for you that you knew you’d never be able to pay.

     In this time of uncertainty, when the terror and fear and sin is so clearly visible, it is time for us to return to the weeping Jesus, and remember His death until He comes again.

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This was my pastor’s newsletter in our church’s bi-monthly newsletter, The Circuit Rider, (August/September 2016), First United Methodist Church, Carmichaels, PA. (Based on an original devotional I wrote in 2002).

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Why So Much Evil?

In the past few weeks, it’s felt a little bit like the world has gone sort of crazy! Runners in Boston were bombed, a plant in Texas blew up, a building in Bangladesh simply collapsed, entire communities in the mid-west were being flooded, a doctor in our own state is on trial for unbelievably heinous crimes against newborn babies. And on and on the list goes. Many have heard the news and asked questions like: “Where was God?” “Why would a good God allow things like this?”

Peter, in the latter half of the first century, was asked similar questions by those first Christians as they were being rounded up by soldiers and then being persecuted… and killed… just because they believed in Jesus. They couldn’t understand why Jesus hadn’t come back to conquer the evil and take the Christians home to heaven. In 2 Peter 3:9 we read: “The Lord isn’t really being slow about his promise, as some people think. No, he is being patient for your sake. He does not want anyone to be destroyed, but wants everyone to repent.” (NLT)  God holds off the Day of Judgment because He’s still holding out the offer to repent for those who are still enemies of God.

Now-a-days is just the same. Every time something horrible happens, people  still grapple with the questions of “Why?” and “What now?”  In the gospel of Luke, Jesus is told about a horrible, heinous crime where the Roman governor, Pontius Pilate, killed some Galileans as they brought their offerings to the Temple. Jesus doesn’t answer “Why?” but he DOES answer the question of “What do we do now?”

About this time Jesus was informed that Pilate had murdered some people from Galilee as they were offering sacrifices at the Temple. “Do you think those Galileans were worse sinners than all the other people from Galilee?” Jesus asked. “Is that why they suffered? Not at all! And you will perish, too, unless you repent of your sins and turn to God. And what about the eighteen people who died when the tower in Siloam fell on them? Were they the worst sinners in Jerusalem? No, and I tell you again that unless you repent, you will perish, too.“  —Luke 13:1-5 (NLT)

Back in Eden, Grandpa Adam and Grandma Eve knew only good and God protected them from knowing evil or experiencing its effects. They chose to believe Satan’s explanation of how deprived they were because God was protecting them from the knowledge of good AND evil… and so they took matters into their own hands and they ate fruit from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. And all of their kids through the thousands of years ever since are regularly made to know the good AND the evil. We can thank our great-something or other grandparents for the inheritance… we get to know and feel the effects of evil.

So in God’s perfection, He protected us from experiencing and knowing evil… and we complained. Now we know evil too intimately!

That choice has already been made and there’s nothing we can do about whether or not we know evil. The one choice that remains is: Will we let evil remind us of our need for God? Will we repent and follow Him?

This is my pastor’s letter for the Clarks Mills UMC newsletter: The Flame (May 2013).

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